Capital Loss

Business, Legal & Accounting Glossary

Definition: Capital Loss


Quick Summary of Capital Loss


The loss incurred when a capital asset (investment or real estate) decreases in value. This loss is not realized until the asset is sold for a price that is lower than the original purchase price.



Full Definition of Capital Loss


A capital loss is a decrease in the value of an asset below its purchase price. Capital loss reduces a taxpayer’s income tax. If you’ve held the asset for more than one year, the capital loss is long-term; if you’ve held it for one year or less, it’s a short-term capital loss. A capital loss is realized once the capital asset is sold at a loss; until the asset is sold, the capital loss is unrealized. Once the capital loss is realized, it will go to reduce a taxpayer’s capital gains tax. If the capital loss is greater than the IRS preset limit (i.e: $3,000 in 2007), the capital loss over such IRS preset limit (i.e. carryover capital loss) can be carried to the next tax year. Note that if the carryover capital loss is a short-term capital loss, it will go to offset a short-term gain in the next tax year, not a long-term gain, and vice-versa.


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Capital Loss. PayrollHeaven.com. Retrieved October 20, 2020, from PayrollHeaven.com website: https://payrollheaven.com/define/capital-loss/

Definition Sources


Definitions for Capital Loss are sourced/syndicated and enhanced from:

  • A Dictionary of Economics (Oxford Quick Reference)
  • Oxford Dictionary Of Accounting
  • Oxford Dictionary Of Business & Management

This glossary post was last updated: 25th March, 2020 | 4 Views.