Bill Of Rights

Business, Legal & Accounting Glossary

Definition: Bill Of Rights



What is the dictionary definition of Bill Of Rights?

Dictionary Definition


n. the first ten amendments to the federal Constitution demanded by several states in return for ratifying the Constitution, since the failure to protect these rights was a glaring omission in the Constitution as adopted in convention in 1787. Adopted and ratified in 1791, the Bill of Rights are: First: Prohibits laws establishing a religion (separation of church and state), and bans laws which would restrict freedom of religion, speech, press (now interpreted as covering all media), right to peaceably assemble and petition the government. Second: A “well-regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.” This is often claimed as giving the unfettered right of individuals to own guns, but is actually limited to the right of “the” people, meaning the body politic or the public as a group, to bear arms as militiamen Third: No quartering of soldiers in private homes without the owner’s consent. Fourth: No unreasonable search and seizures, no warrants without probable cause, and such warrants must be upon “oath or affirmation” and describe the place to be searched or the person or things to be taken. Fifth: Prohibits criminal charges for death penalty (“capital punishment”) or any other “infamous” crime (felony) without indictment by a Grand Jury except under martial law in the time of war or “public danger”; no person may be tried twice for the same offense; no one may be compelled to be a witness against himself (“taking the Fifth”), no one can be deprived of life, liberty or property without “due process of law”; no taking of property for public use (eminent domain) without just compensation. These rights have become applicable to states through the 14th Amendment as well as state constitutions. Sixth: Rights of criminal defendants to a speedy and public trial, impartial local jury, information on the nature and cause of accusation, confront witnesses against him, right to subpoena witnesses, and have counsel. Seventh: Juries may be demanded in civil cases (over $20) and the jury shall be trier of the fact in such cases as required by Common Law. Eighth: No excessive bail, excessive fines or “cruel and unusual punishment.” Note that denial of bail in murder cases or when the accused may flee is not “excessive,” and capital punishment (like the gas chamber) may be cruel but not necessarily unusual. inth: Stating these rights shall not be construed to deny that other rights are retained by the people. Tenth: Powers given to the United States (central government) and not prohibited to the states, are reserved to the states or to the people.


Full Definition of Bill Of Rights


The ‘glorious revolution’ of 1688 brought about the downfall of King James II of England (who was also James VII of Scotland); the new monarchs, William and Mary, were obliged in 1689 to accept the terms of the Bill of Rights, which substantially reduced the prerogative powers of the monarchy, and laid the foundation for the principle of Parliamentary supremacy. In particular, the Bill made it unlawful for the monarch to (i) levy taxes; (ii) maintain an army; (iii) make, modify or suspend laws, and (iv) constitute courts without Parliamentary authority. It also made the operation of Parliament (including all debates and speeches) beyond legal challenge in the courts and provided for the free election of its Members. In Scotland, the Claim of Right, which had similar provisions, was enacted in the same year (1689).

See also Constitutional legislation.


Cite Term


To help you cite our definitions in your bibliography, here is the proper citation layout for the three major formatting styles, with all of the relevant information filled in.

Page URL
https://payrollheaven.com/define/bill-of-rights/
Modern Language Association (MLA):
Bill Of Rights. PayrollHeaven.com. Payroll & Accounting Heaven Ltd. November 30, 2020 https://payrollheaven.com/define/bill-of-rights/.
Chicago Manual of Style (CMS):
Bill Of Rights. PayrollHeaven.com. Payroll & Accounting Heaven Ltd. https://payrollheaven.com/define/bill-of-rights/ (accessed: November 30, 2020).
American Psychological Association (APA):
Bill Of Rights. PayrollHeaven.com. Retrieved November 30, 2020, from PayrollHeaven.com website: https://payrollheaven.com/define/bill-of-rights/

Definition Sources


Definitions for Bill Of Rights are sourced/syndicated and enhanced from:

  • A Dictionary of Economics (Oxford Quick Reference)
  • Oxford Dictionary Of Accounting
  • Oxford Dictionary Of Business & Management

This glossary post was last updated: 26th April, 2020 | 1 Views.